Hospice Services

Hospice Services

The hospice doctor (and possibly the patient’s personal doctor) along with a case manager, typically a registered nurse, work together to provide comfort care which is designed to alleviate physical pain and symptoms. Certified nursing aides (CNA) and home health aides (HHA) visit multiple times a week and assist with more routine needs such as bathing and dressing, serving meals and helping patients to eat, turning or repositioning patients who are bedridden and many other tasks. A social worker, chaplain and volunteers work to provide social, emotional and spiritual support to both the patient and their family.

Related: Accredited Healthcare of America provides four levels of care to meet the needs of patients and their families.

The interdisciplinary hospice team:

  • Develops a care plan that meets each patient’s individual needs for pain management and symptom control
  • Manages the patient’s pain and symptoms according to their care plan
  • Assists the patient and family with the emotional, psychosocial and spiritual aspects of dying
  • Provides needed drugs, medical supplies, and equipment
  • Coaches the family on how to care for the patient
  • Delivers special services like speech and physical therapy when needed
  • Assists in arrangement of short-term inpatient care available when pain or symptoms become too difficult to manage at home, or the caregiver needs respite time
  • Provides bereavement care and counseling to surviving family and friends

Related: Blog: Understanding Hospice

Where is hospice care provided?

We provide hospice care services wherever people with life-limiting illness reside and could benefit from our care, including:

  • patient’s home
  • hospitals
  • nursing homes
  • other long-term care facilities
  • freestanding hospice centers